Dental Hygienist in Australia

Dental Hygienist In Australia

Top 3 Pros And Cons Of Being A Dental Hygienist In Australia

Dental hygienists (often called dental assistants, dental nurses or dental chairside assistants) generally make a good living and are in high demand in cities throughout Australia. If you’re thinking about becoming a dental hygienist or just want to know the specific duties of a dental hygienist, you’ll learn all you need to know below.

What does a dental hygienist do exactly?

The short answer (especially if you’re asking a dental hygienist!) is just about everything involved in running a dental office, including performing teeth cleanings, taking x-rays and ensuring patient comfort before and after treatments.

In addition, they welcome and get to know all new patients and provide continuous education to help them improve their dental health.

Now that you know what a dental hygienist does, see what their general consensus is concerning the pros and cons of their job.

Top 3 Pros Of Being A Dental Hygienist

Dental hygiene is a rapidly growing field with plenty of job growth and employment opportunities and is one of the faster growing occupations as larger numbers of Australians are placing a greater emphasis on oral health.
Clinical dental hygienists are in high demand and command a very good salary, even right out of school. Hourly wages are highly dependant on experience, but is typically in the range of $22-$30 per hour as of 2018.
Barrier to entry for becoming a qualified dental hygienist is relatively low, with great career opportunities available once the minimum standard of a 2-year Advanced Diploma of Oral Health in Dental Hygiene is achieved.

There are always two sides of the coin and this growing field is no different…

Top 3 Cons Of Being A Dental Hygienist

If you’re the kind of person that loves routine and doing basically the same thing every day, great, otherwise, you may want to think twice about becoming a dental assistant as the job will be very much the same wherever you decide to work.
The dental hygienist field also has very limited flexibility when it comes to career advancement and trainee dental assistants are very likely to end up as senior dental assistants.
Because dental hygienists essentially repeat the same tasks of working in people’s mouths every day, there is a great likelihood of running into difficult patients and the byproducts of dirty mouths like tooth decay, bleeding gums and bad breath.

Like any other long-term commitment, it’s up to you to perform your due diligence and decide for yourself if becoming a dental assistant is right for you.

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